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One time he punched me so hard he gave me a black eye only because he thought I knew another a guy. Because of the abusive relationship, I didn’t have a good high school experience.” Coming from a family where intimate partner violence was prevalent, Tanisha continued to live in the vicious abusive cycle, and she eventually married her abuser.

Whatever stage you and your teen are going through in discussing and learning about dating violence — whether you want to teach them about healthy relationships for the future, or you’re concerned with a relationship they are currently in and want to give them advice — there are plenty of resources that can be really helpful.

From phone numbers and victim services centers, to online pamphlets and sites, we’ve put together a list of some of the best resources for teens.

Once when I refused, he threw me down a flight of stairs. I remember, he use to cut me all over my body with a knife.

If I so much as spoke with another guy, he would hit me.

According to loveisrespect.org, teens stay in abusive relationships for many reasons: These statistics are particularly troubling given the lasting impact dating abuse can have on victims.

Students that had been abused by a partner were more likely than those that hadn’t to report being bullied on school grounds and missing school because they felt unsafe.

Tanisha explained her fear of being in the abusive relationship, “He knew my every move, who I was with, where I was going, and who my friends were. According to the CDC, teens who are in abusive relationships are more susceptible to depression and anxiety, unhealthy risk-taking behaviors (e.g., drug and alcohol use), self-harm and suicidal ideation. You matter, your life matters, living a happy healthy life matters. We need to teach our children about abuse and abusive people early.

He would threaten me, and tell me if I ever left him he would kill me. Plus, teens who are in abusive relationships in high school are at a greater risk of being in abusive relationships in college. Love yourself enough to get the help you need to get out of the abusive relationship. If you are the parent of a teen who is in an abusive relationship - be supportive. Abusive relationships are complicated and what your teen needs most is your unconditional love and support.”Vagi, K.

She recalls disciplining her three-year-old son, and in her scolding he told her his ‘’ (pointing to the room in which she was frequently abused) and beat her when he got home. Tanisha knew at that moment if she didn’t leave her partner the abuse cycle would repeat.

She questioned the messages she was sending her children and how it would affect them in the future. Today, fourteen years later, Tanisha carries her message to other abuse survivors by speaking out both locally and nationally on issues of abuse.

By promoting positive relationship behaviors, teens learn about what they should expect from peers and how they are expected to behave toward peers, in both intimate and friendship relationships.

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