Updating excel data with dsn less connection vba

From the menu bar, select inked Tables as shown below: By default, Microsoft Access will want to link to another Access database for it's Linked Table source.

Browsing the 'Files of Type' pull-down menu on the bottom left of the interface will give you a general idea of just how broad of a scope is available for Linked Table sources.

Make note that Microsoft Access' naming convention process will concatenate the RDBMS schema owner and RDBMS object name in the format of .

This was in preparation for using Microsoft Access as a front-end tool for a SQL Server 2005 database.

Though Access can be considered a sub-par application by the relational database elitists, it can be a very capable alternative for querying data from SQL Server without the learning curve associated with Visual Studio.

In some respects, it is the perfect tool for the casual business user who wants to drill into and share their data. In order to connect to Microsoft SQL Server from Microsoft Access you need to set up at least one Linked Table.

This table is a pointer to a table in a SQL Server database that is associated with a pre-defined System ODBC Data Source Name (referred to as a DSN from this point forward).

If you are privy to this information please select the correct field because performance depends on it.

If performance is not an issue, you may simply press the Cancel button throughout this process.

The process from this point forward is compatible with all releases of SQL Server since version 7.0.

The first step in setting up a linked table is to navigate to the Linked Tables dialog in Access.

The knowledge articles contains solutions and guides.

Thus far in this tips series on Access and SQL Server, we have created an ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) using the OLEDB driver for connecting to SQL Server 2000, as well as a System DSN to connect to a SQL Server 2005 instance using the new SNAC (SQL Native Client) driver.

In truth, you have many options for setting up Linked Tables from Access; many RDBMSs (Relational Database Management Systems) and Microsoft Office applications for example - even Share Point and Outlook are options for linking tables back to Microsoft Access.

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